Whole Wheat Recipes – Long Term Food Storage

WHAT IS WHOLE WHEAT?

Whole wheat refers to the ENTIRE grain.  It’s that grain that, when ground, turns into flour.

WHAT TYPES OF WHEAT ARE THERE?

There are 2 basic types of wheat great for your long term food storage.  Those are hard white wheat and hard red wheat.  Red wheat is darker in color and has a stronger flavor.  White wheat is light in color and a lighter flavor.  Nutritionally speaking, they are pretty much the same.

WHY SHOULD I HAVE WHEAT IN MY LONG TERM FOOD STORAGE?

  • It’s more nutritious than all-purpose flour. Whole wheat flour contains more minerals, vitamins, and natural phytochemicals than does all-purpose flour.
  • Helps with stress. Whole wheat contains B vitamins, which are necessary for healthy nerves.
  • Cleans you out. Whole wheat recipes provide more fiber and eating fiber can help prevent many bowel problems.
  • Helps you lose weight and keep it off! The bounteous fiber in whole wheat has almost no calories, keeps you fuller longer, absorbs three times its weight in water, cuts absorption of calories, and takes half as much to fill you up.

WHERE SHOULD I STORE MY WHOLE WHEAT?

Store it in a cool, dry area.  Unopened it will store for 30+ years.  Opened it will last a couple of years.

WHERE SHOULD I STORE MY WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR?

Ground wheat loses its nutritional value very quickly.  In addition, ground wheat can go rancid because of the wheat germ (the part of the wheat kernel that serves as the seed).  After you grind wheat, cover it tightly and store it in the refrigerator or freezer.  Never store ground wheat flour near foods with strong odors, such as apples and onions, as flour readily absorbs odors.  (No one wants an onion-flavored cookie!)

HOW MUCH WHEAT SHOULD I HAVE IN MY LONG-TERM FOOD STORAGE?

For a one year supply, you need about 300 pounds of grains per person.  That equates to 25 pounds a month per person.  Don’t panic-it doesn’t need to consist entirely of wheat.  The 300 pounds can be divided between wheat, rice, oats, corn, pasta, etc. according to your family’s needs and preferences.

SHOULD I PURCHASE HARD RED WHEAT OR HARD WHITE WHEAT FOR MY FOOD STORAGE?

It depends on what you like, but I have mostly hard white wheat and a little hard red wheat.  Why? Because the hard white wheat is so much better for whole wheat recipes.  It tastes better, gives a better texture, and it’s what my family likes.

WHERE CAN I PURCHASE WHEAT FOR MY FOOD STORAGE?

If you want to save a little money, you can visit your local LDS Cannery and can it yourself.  Or, you can purchase hard RED wheat online already canned through LDS Distribution Services Online.  Unfortunately, you can’t purchase the hard WHITE wheat online through LDS Distribution Services Online-but it IS available at LDS Canneries.

If you just want to click a few buttons and have your wheat ordered and shipping to your house, you can check these online sources.

HOW DO I USE WHOLE WHEAT IN MY BAKING/COOKING?

The easiest way to get whole wheat recipes is to grind it up and use it as flour.
Look for recipes that call for:

  • equal amounts of brown sugar and white sugar
  • chocolate
  • fruit or vegetable, i.e. mashed banana, zucchini, etc.
  • strong spices, i.e. cinnamon, apple pie spice, etc.
  • nuts

WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT COOKING WITH YOUR FOOD STORAGE?

Learn to love your food storage!

  • Elizabeth Golly

    Super stupid question. Where do i find gluten?

  • Pingback: The Food Storage Shopper » Updated Grains Page!

  • Suzie

    Crystal- I have found my white flour canned from the cannery
    to have a “taste” that I can’t cover up.Doesn’t seem to be in store
    bought bags of flour.Is this from the O2 packet?How can I
    get rid of this taste?Any tips would be appreciated.Thanks

  • Crystal-Everyday Food Storage

    Suzie,
    How old is your flour? The flour WILL go rancid and DOES NOT store for longer than THREE years. Any bad flavor would not be from the oxygen absorber.

  • Ge

    Hello Crystal… I do enjoy your information on baking bread. I have been using Dave’s Bread for a couple of years now, it is made in Milwaukie, Oregon, but the price for a loaf is almost $5.00, so I may try to make something similar. The big difference is that he uses” sprouted whole wheat”. It is very easy for me to digest, could you please tell me how to do this and incorporate it into your recipes? Please keep up the good work. I’m very glad you have taken this project on.
    Ge

  • Gzornblat

    I have done my own sprouted wheat in baking. It takes a couple of extra steps but is very delicious (as a disclaimer, I haven’t tried it in the EZ Bread recipe, so it might take some tweaking on ingredients and trial and error before it works pefectly). You take the wheat berries and put them in a mason jar and fill it with double the water of wheat (For example, 1 cup wheat and 2 cups water) and put cheesecloth over the top with a rubberband.  You let it soak overnight, then in the morning you drain the water, rinse the berries with fresh water and place at an angle upside down so that the wheat continues to drain through the cheesecloth.  Every 8 hours or so rinse with fresh water and drain. After 1-2 days of this, the wheat will have sprouted little tails.  When the tails are 1/8th of an inch, spread the berries onto a baking sheet, put your oven on its lowest setting and dry them out in the oven for a couple of hours. Alternately, one could use a dehydrator.  Then grind as you would non-sprouted wheat (I still don’t have a mill, so I use a coffee grinder in small batches).

  • Debbie

    I have hard red wheat that has been stored for 30 + years. I know that it is still good–but am wondering if I grind some up and make bread with it–will it rise well?? I haven’t had good success with whole wheat recipes, and am wondering if that is why…
    Debbie

  • eatfoodstorage

    That maybe why. But red wheat is a different beast than white wheat. What recipes have you tried it in?